The female mannequin of the 21st century looks more like a "real person" than ever before, and the same holds true for a male mannequin. Intricately detailed bodies, vibrantly painted faces with eyes that really seem to have a twinkle, the mannequin for sale to the fashion and retail industries these days is a far cry from their ancestors of just a few decades ago.

Male Mannequins have been around for centuries in one form or another, but it wasn't until the invention of the plate glass window that they began to show up modeling clothes in retail stores. These mannequins were a far cry from the sexy mannequin of today; in fact they looked more like scarecrows than a real person, especially since their bodies were usually stuffed with straw.

Still, they served their purpose well enough; they excited an interest in the clothing on sale within the store or showroom where they were displayed but there were those who realized that a female mannequin could be so much more.

In the 1930s a mysterious woman began making appearances at such hot New York nightspots as the Stork Club as well as at the opera, the ballet and the theater. Wherever she was she sat motionless, a cigarette in her hand at all times. Her name was Cynthia and although she never uttered a word she excited interest all over Manhattan and beyond.